A New Classroom

There's a new way to teach rising up in classrooms today. Out with the standard teacher-student dynamic where one tells the other how they are doing. Out with the typical learn and forget it method. Today's classroom leaves students more aware of their strengths and weaknesses. It gives them the capability of learning what they need to know, and how to use that knowledge to excel in the real world.

In this post by Kyle Spencer of The New York Times, a classroom in Brooklyn is just one of many that are revitalizing how teaching and learning is done in the classroom.

The key is for students to recognize on their own what they need additional practice on, how to motivate themselves to get that practice, and how to utilize the resources available to them, like the help they receive from teachers.

The emergence of online learning in recent years have made great strides in this area. Students get an interactive approach to learning, while getting real-time results on real-world questions. Students are encouraged to think deeper about a topic, while also being challenged with comprehension-style questions.

In Kyle Spencer's report of just one Brooklyn classroom, there is no such thing as failing. Students no longer receive letter grades. Instead, they are meant to complete a series of grade-level skills before moving on to a higher level. This allows students to learn at their own pace while not feeling left behind. It allows students to be confident with their abilities while not having the threat of failure hanging over their heads. The point here is to learn, and to learn well.

Our subscription-based platform allows students to do just that. Read about the five senses and how the body works. Answer questions about the reading. Use helpful math tools to solve a problem. Get helpful tips from the Reading Watch Dog. Complete a graphic organizer or interactive game for added practice.

Try it all for FREE for 15 days. No commitment necessary.

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